The Tilbury Speech

The Tilbury Speech of 1588 was Elizabeth I’s most famous speech and was given in August 1588 to the land forces at Tilbury, in Essex, who were preparing to defend England against the Spanish Armada.

There are two main versions of the speech:-

Version 1

This version is from a letter written by Dr Leonel Sharp to the Duke of Buckingham in 1623/1624 as he recalled Elizabeth I’s famous speech:-

My loving people,

We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our selves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery; but I assure you I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good-will of my subjects; and therefore I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live and die amongst you all; to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.

I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.

I know already, for your forwardness you have deserved rewards and crowns; and We do assure you in the word of a prince, they shall be duly paid you. In the mean time, my lieutenant general shall be in my stead, than whom never prince commanded a more noble or worthy subject; not doubting but by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp, and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.

Version 2

This second version was recorded earlier, in 1612, by William Leigh:-

Come on now, my companions at arms, and fellow soldiers, in the field, now for the Lord, for your Queen, and for the Kingdom. For what are these proud Philistines, that they should revile the host of the living God? I have been your Prince in peace, so will I be in war; neither will I bid you go and fight, but come and let us fight the battle of the Lord. The enemy perhaps may challenge my sex for that I am a woman, so may I likewise charge their mould for that they are but men, whose breath is in their nostrils, and if God do not charge England with the sins of England, little do I fear their forceā€¦ Si deus nobiscum quis contra nos? (if God is with us, who can be against us?)

Source: Wikipedia

One Response to “The Tilbury Speech”

  1. Jenny says:

    I didn’t know about the second speech but knew defitenitely of the first and prefer it and think it is more of a E1 style. I would prefer to bellieve the first — Am sure that Churchill must have taken that one into consideration in his famours speech of “We will fight them on the beaches, etc. – We will never surrender!”

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