Are there many belongings of the Tudors (particularly Elizabeth and Anne Boleyn’s) left in English museums? I was wondering if you thought a lot of them were destroyed by the “anti-royalists” from the 17th and 18th centuries? (Until I can go to England myself and visit the wonderful museums myself, this is something I have ofter wondered about.)

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The following possessions are still around today:-
Anne Boleyn - The Boleyn Cup was made for Anne Boleyn in 1535 when she was Queen, just a year before her death, and is made out of silver and gilt. It was apparently passed on to her daughter, Elizabeth I, who gave it as a gift to Richard Master, her physician, and then he eventually gave it to St John the Baptist Parish Church in Cirencester where it still lives today

Anne Boleyn - The silver gilt clock which was given to Anne Boleyn by Henry VIII. The clock features “DIEU ET MON DROIT” inscribed on one of the weights, as well as Anne’s motto “The Most Happye” and the initial H and A intertwined in a lover’s knot. The richly decorated clock also features fleurs de lys, miniature heads and a lion bearing the arms of England.

You can see a photo of it at http://images.library.yale.edu/strawberryhill/oneitem.asp?id=74

Elizabeth I - The locket ring which Elizabeth wore and which contained miniatures of her and her mother, Anne Boleyn, is kept at Chequers, the country residence of the British Prime Minister.

Elizabeth I - I think Hatfield House have some of her belongings including a pair of riding gloves.

Elizabeth I - A christening gown thought to have been worn by Elizabeth was found at Sudeley Castle and is on display there.

Elizabeth I - The Victoria and Albert Museum have a virginal once owned by Elizabeth - see http://www.vam.ac.uk/res_cons/conservation/journal/number_42/virginial/index.html

7 Responses to “Are there many belongings of the Tudors (particularly Elizabeth and Anne Boleyn’s) left in English museums? I was wondering if you thought a lot of them were destroyed by the “anti-royalists” from the 17th and 18th centuries? (Until I can go to England myself and visit the wonderful museums myself, this is something I have ofter wondered about.)”

  1. English Person says:

    I recently visited Warwick Castle and they have one of Elizabeth I’s riding saddles in a glass case in the Great Hall.

  2. Claire says:

    Yes! I noticed that when I took my children there in the summer. Have you been to Kenilworth Castle? I love walking round there and thinking about Dudley doing all the building work there to impress Elizabeth.

  3. Felix says:

    I haven’t been able to find information on what happened to Elizabeth I’s great collection of jewels and wardrobe after she died. Does anybody know? Thanks

  4. Jenifer says:

    I just googled “Elizabeth I actual clothing” and came across some very interesting things. There are a few remaining garments in museums and private collections. I saw some of her gloves, one or two of her remaining gowns. Some of the sites stated that most of her jewels were destroyed or melted down. There is a locket ring of hers that has a miniature of her mother, Anne Boleyn, and of her (Elizabeth) that she wore constantly. Some really amazing and intricate items that lasted over 400 years…truly amazing.

  5. Jenifer says:

    I viewed a lot of these on Pinterest…. http://www.pinterest.com/christinalipe/1600-1699-clothing/. They also show some items from Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII, and Mary I. The jewelry, I viewed here… http://tudorfaces.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-chequers-locket-ring-mother-and.html . ww.thetudorswiki.com/page/ARTIFACTS+of+the+Tudors. Hope that helps…I am so fascinated by the Tudors.

  6. Christine says:

    In Hatfield House Hertfordshire are a pair of Elizabeths stockings and a pair of gloves.

  7. PETER says:

    I had read somewhere that quite a few of Elizabeth’s dresses were passed on to the actors who performed masques before King James.

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